Addiction to Search

 

Addiction to Search

August 4, 2018

690 words
2 min 51 read

On my way to research the search phenomenon, I just recognized, my addiction to ‘SEARCH’
 
I found an equalling interesting subject: ‘FAKE NEWS’ NEWPHILOSPHER Issue #17: Communication, September 1, 2017
By Tom Chatfield
He quotes philosopher Harry Frankfurt in his 2005 book ‘ON BULLSHIT’.

Quoting Mr. Frankfurt “The essence of bullshit is not that it is false but that it is phony.”
 
 

“A liar and an honest person are interested in the truth, they are playing on opposite sides of the same game.
 
A bullshitter, however, has no such constraint.”
 
 
A politician witnessed the collapse of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001.
During a campaign interview in 2015, he proclaimed that New Jersey, which had a heavy Arab population, he saw the Muslims cheering the collapse of these towers.

A normal politician caught in a lie would offer an apology, or an excuse or offer some reason when he knew he was caught.
However, this politician made up a different rule: claim what is false is FAKE NEWS.

I read the other day a summary of FAKE NEWS as being ‘propaganda’.

I now have to concede that calling it ‘BULLSHIT’ is far more accurate and, I dare say, more enjoyable.

For Frankfurt, a bullshitter “is neither on the side of truth nor the side of false… He does not care whether the things he says describe reality. He just makes them up to suit his purpose.”

Our author, Tom Chatfield, continues “these words capture something central to the phenomenon that is called fake news: the belief that emotive impact is not only the supreme test of a story but the only metric that matters.”
 

WOW!

 

Two perceptive insights in four paragraphs.

I have to move onto the main reason for this post but I will leave you with Mr. Chatfield’s observation: we are in a “FESTIVAL OF BULLSHIT” (caps mine).

What a fabulous metaphor!

Enjoy slogging around in this bullshit for a long while longer.


In the 1950s, psychologists found that, when an electrode was placed in a rat’s brain, the lateral hypothalamus, they would give themselves shocks.
 
 

They would do this rather than eat or drink.

They would do this up to seven hundred times per hour!

“What is especially troubling is that humans have a brain system similar to rats.” Antonia Case 11/14/2014 in the NewPhilospher Issue #5: ‘self’
 

Think about that for a minute.

How many of us can lie around, on a couch, doing nothing? Not reading, not watching TV just staring off into nothingness?

Neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp was a neuroscientist and psychobiologist at Washington State University.
He and other researchers say that we are happiest when we ’re in search mode, seeking rewards of some kind.

Apparently, it doesn’t make much difference what we are searching for.
 
 
“We seek new weather, new disasters, new ideas, new inspiration. The more novel and unexpected, the bigger hit we get from it.”

Ms. Case uses the analogy our seeking is a “conveyor belt that’s forever moving onward”.

We may profess that we really want to “lay up in a hammock and happily look at the sky, neuroscientists give us the unfortunate verdict, that no, we’ll simply replace the search with another.”

“Our seeking pathways, called dopamine transmitter, which energizes us while seeking, are firing best when we are in search mode.”

Professor Panksepp says “animals can be driven into a frenzy when rewards for search are dished out in minuscule chunks; unable to be satisfied, the search continues, at a more frantic pace.”

How do you react when the ding announcing a new text message or email tinkles on your phone? This is the” bell Pavlov rang for his dogs.”

“We become sweating rats in the laboratory, pressing the lever to get our fix!”
Are you like a drug user?

“Drug users get to the point where they can’t stop seeking drugs, even as the rewards for using decline over time.”
“We keep hitting the refresh button because we have no choice–we’re caught in a loop.”


Are we doing harm?

Thanks for stopping by.


Craig
 
PS I am a rat on a conveyor belt hunting for a sugar fix.
 


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